1   And after five days the high priest Ananias came down with some elders and a spokesman, one Tertullus. They laid before the governor their case against Paul.

2 And when he had been summoned, Tertullus began to accuse him, saying: “Since through you we enjoy much peace, and since by your foresight, most excellent Felix, reforms are being made for this nation, 3 in every way and everywhere we accept this with all gratitude. 4 But, to detain you no further, I beg you in your kindness to hear us briefly. 5 For we have found this man a plague, one who stirs up riots among all the Jews throughout the world and is a ringleader of the sect of the Nazarenes. 6 He even tried to profane the temple, but we seized him. 8 By examining him yourself you will be able to find out from him about everything of which we accuse him.”

9 The Jews also joined in the charge, affirming that all these things were so.

 

10 And when the governor had nodded to him to speak, Paul replied: “Knowing that for many years you have been a judge over this nation, I cheerfully make my defense. 11 You can verify that it is not more than twelve days since I went up to worship in Jerusalem, 12 and they did not find me disputing with anyone or stirring up a crowd, either in the temple or in the synagogues or in the city. 13 Neither can they prove to you what they now bring up against me. 14 But this I confess to you, that according to the Way, which they call a sect, I worship the God of our fathers, believing everything laid down by the Law and written in the Prophets, 15 having a hope in God, which these men themselves accept, that there will be a resurrection of both the just and the unjust. 16 So I always take pains to have a clear conscience toward both God and man. 17 Now after several years I came to bring alms to my nation and to present offerings. 18 While I was doing this, they found me purified in the temple, without any crowd or tumult. But some Jews from Asia— 19 they ought to be here before you and to make an accusation, should they have anything against me. 20 Or else let these men themselves say what wrongdoing they found when I stood before the council, 21 other than this one thing that I cried out while standing among them: ‘It is with respect to the resurrection of the dead that I am on trial before you this day.’”

22 But Felix, having a rather accurate knowledge of the Way, put them off, saying, “When Lysias the tribune comes down, I will decide your case.” 23 Then he gave orders to the centurion that he should be kept in custody but have some liberty, and that none of his friends should be prevented from attending to his needs.

24 After some days Felix came with his wife Drusilla, who was Jewish, and he sent for Paul and heard him speak about faith in Christ Jesus. 25 And as he reasoned about righteousness and self-control and the coming judgment, Felix was alarmed and said, “Go away for the present. When I get an opportunity I will summon you.” 26 At the same time he hoped that money would be given him by Paul. So he sent for him often and conversed with him. 27 When two years had elapsed, Felix was succeeded by Porcius Festus. And desiring to do the Jews a favor, Felix left Paul in prison.

 

1 Better is a dry morsel with quiet than a house full of feasting with strife.

2 A servant who deals wisely will rule over a son who acts shamefully and will share the inheritance as one of the brothers.

3 The crucible is for silver, and the furnace is for gold, and the LORD tests hearts.

4 An evildoer listens to wicked lips, and a liar gives ear to a mischievous tongue.

5 Whoever mocks the poor insults his Maker; he who is glad at calamity will not go unpunished.

6 Grandchildren are the crown of the aged, and the glory of children is their fathers.

7 Fine speech is not becoming to a fool; still less is false speech to a prince.

8 A bribe is like a magic stone in the eyes of the one who gives it; wherever he turns he prospers.

9 Whoever covers an offense seeks love, but he who repeats a matter separates close friends.

10 A rebuke goes deeper into a man of understanding than a hundred blows into a fool.

11 An evil man seeks only rebellion, and a cruel messenger will be sent against him.

12 Let a man meet a she-bear robbed of her cubs rather than a fool in his folly.

13 If anyone returns evil for good, evil will not depart from his house.

14 The beginning of strife is like letting out water, so quit before the quarrel breaks out.

15 He who justifies the wicked and he who condemns the righteous are both alike an abomination to the LORD.

16 Why should a fool have money in his hand to buy wisdom when he has no sense?

17 A friend loves at all times, and a brother is born for adversity.

18 One who lacks sense gives a pledge and puts up security in the presence of his neighbor.

19 Whoever loves transgression loves strife; he who makes his door high seeks destruction.

20 A man of crooked heart does not discover good, and one with a dishonest tongue falls into calamity.

21 He who sires a fool gets himself sorrow, and the father of a fool has no joy.

22 A joyful heart is good medicine, but a crushed spirit dries up the bones.

23 The wicked accepts a bribe in secret to pervert the ways of justice.

24 The discerning sets his face toward wisdom, but the eyes of a fool are on the ends of the earth.

25 A foolish son is a grief to his father and bitterness to her who bore him.

26 To impose a fine on a righteous man is not good, nor to strike the noble for their uprightness.

27 Whoever restrains his words has knowledge, and he who has a cool spirit is a man of understanding.

28 Even a fool who keeps silent is considered wise; when he closes his lips, he is deemed intelligent.”

(Acts 24:1–27; Proverbs 17:1–28 ESVi)

Write comment (0 Comments)